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7/7/2020  
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R&D
Female candidates ranked higher

Women more likely than men to get jobs at university science departments


A new study suggests that female candidates are twice as likely as men to gain tenure-track positions in science-related university departments, all other things being equal.
Ibercampus 15/4/2015 Send to a friend
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The study authors surveyed almost 900 faculty members at 371 national universities. The authors presented the profiles of fictional job candidates, asking participants whom they would hire for assistant professorship positions in biology, engineering, economics, and psychology. The female candidates ranked higher in almost every case, the researchers found.

Women have always been scarce in academic science, technology, engineering, and math, or STEM. That has been attributed to gender bias, prejudice against women who take maternity leave and other discrimination.

Recently, however, women with advanced STEM degrees have had a better chance of getting university jobs. For example, out of 96 mathematics hires from 1995 through 2003, 20 percent of applicants were women, but 32 percent of those offered jobs were female. Some scholars have said this apparent female advantage was because women who overcome the hurdles to a STEM Ph.D. are generally stronger candidates than male counterparts.

To test that hypothesis, Cornell University´s Wendy Williams and Stephen Ceci ran five related experiments. They sent descriptions of made-up job candidates in biology and psychology (where women are well represented) and economics and engineering (where they are not) to 873 faculty members at 371 colleges. The experiments differed in, among other things, how many candidates the participants evaluated (one or three, so participants would be less likely to guess this was a men vs. women study).

Overall, even though their qualifications and characteristics were identical, women were ranked first by 67 percent of participants, the authors report in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. That contradicts a 2012 study in which academics gave higher ratings to hypothetical job candidates with male names than those with female names (and identical resumes).

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