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10/8/2020  
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DEBATES

Will robots replace humans jobs?

Robots

Nesta´s Creativity versus Robots report found but highly creative roles are much less likely to be taken by robots, with 86pc of these roles at low or no risk of automation in the UK. The report ranked more than 500 professions involving varying levels of creativity to understand which jobs were under threat of automation.
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Artists, musicians, graphic designers and computer game programmers are among the professions least likely to be replaced by robots over the next 20 years but archivists, farmers and distillers are under threat.

Nesta through the report is calling on the Government to create 1m new creative jobs by 2030 to ensure that the UK economy does not end up with a redundant workforce.

The report cites a “sagging middle” in the labour market where machines and computers are replacing employees in routine jobs, such as supermarket checkouts.

The phenomenon is likely to generate increased income inequality between the workers in high-end creative jobs and those in unskilled roles, Nesta warned.

Between 2011 and 2013, the annual growth rate in creative roles hit 3.6pc in the UK, outperforming many other industries and taking the total number of creative jobs to 2.6m. In order to meet the 1m job target, the creative sector must continue to grow 2.6pc each year.
To ensure that more young people hone their creative skills, the innovation organisation recommended that the current focus on STEM subjects (science, technology, engineering and maths) be widened to include art, becoming STEAM.

Nesta points out that "the creative economy is the UK’s unspoken success story, historically deeply rooted and making up one-tenth of the whole economy. It accounts for 2.6 million jobs – from advertising professionals to computer programmers, and from actors to video games developers – more than advanced manufacturing, financial services and construction."

"It also has another advantage: creative jobs are hard to automate. This is important, because it looks like the world is on the verge of a robot revolution in which more and more once-steady jobs are replaced by machines."

"The UK has the potential to generate a million new creative jobs. But for this to happen, we need the right skills and infrastructure to support it", says the report 

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