This website uses its own and third-party cookies. Some of these cookies are used to develop analytical statistics of visits to the webpage, others to manage advertising or even others are necessary for the correct management of the site. If you continue to browse or click in accept we consider you accept the conditions for their use. You can get more information, or learn how to change the settings in our cookies policy?
Versión Española Versión Mexicana Ibercampus English Version Version française Versione italiana

7/7/2020  
    Ibercampus  | Editorial Board | Who we are | Ideology | Contact | Advertising rates | Subscription | RSS RSS
Policies
Inclusion policies
R&D
Employment
Economics
Culture
Green strategies
Health
Society and consumer
Sports
Debates
Interviews
Education
Grants & internships
Training
Trends
Enterprises & CSR
 Enterprises & CSR
ACNUR
AEGON
AIR LIQUIDE
ALCATEL-LUCENT
ALLIANZ
ARCELORMITTAL
ASIFIN
ASSICURAZIONI GENERALI
AXA
BANCO SANTANDER
BASF
BAYER
BBVA
BNP PARIBAS
CARREFOUR
DAIMLER AG
DEUTSCHE BANK
DEUTSCHE BÖRSE
DEUTSCHE TELEKOM
E.ON
ENEL
ENI
FORTIS
FRANCE TÉLÉCOM
GROUPE DANONE
IBERDROLA
INDITEX
ING GROUP
INTESA SANPAOLO
L'ORÉAL
LVMH
MUNICH RE
NOKIA
PHILIPS
RENAULT
REPSOL YPF
RWE
SAINT GOBAIN
SANOFI-AVENTIS
SAP AG
SCHNEIDER ELECTRIC
SIEMENS AG
SOCIÉTÉ GÉNÉRALE
SUEZ
TELECOM ITALIA
TELEFÓNICA
TOTAL S.A.
UNICREDIT
UNILEVER
VINCI
VIVENDI
VOLKSWAGEN

R&D
Watly machine

Supercomputer provides access to water, energy and the internet


A new machine called the Watly offers solutions to three of society´s most important challenges – ensuring access to clean water, sustainable energy generation and reaping the benefits of the evolving digital revolution. Supported by funds from the Horizon 2020 project, the innovative SME behind the project is now nearly ready to unveil its first full-scale Watly machine.
Ibercampus 28/2/2017 Send to a friend
Comparte esta noticia en TwitterFacebookTwitterdel.icio.usYahooRSS
1.1 billion people worldwide still do not have access to a safe source of drinking water, causing more than 4 200 deaths from water-related diseases every day. 1.3 billion people lack access to electricity (more than a fifth of world’s population) and 5 billion worldwide still have no access to the internet. Water and energy are highly interdependent and crucial to human well-being and sustainable socio-economic development. Watly, a trailblazing SME based in Spain and Italy, has devised a truly revolutionary way to tackle all three of these challenges with one machine.

The Watly machine comprises a central array of solar panels connected to four wing units, each of which houses a bank of vapour compression distillation tubes that can boil unsafe water from sources such as rivers and produce safe, clean water fit for human consumption.

But a crucial factor is that the energy used to drive that water purification process is not the electricity generated by the panels. Instead, the process is driven by waste heat harvested from the panels by an air circulation system – an ingenious technique that founder and CEO of Watly, Marco Attisani describes as effectively self-powering. ‘It does not use any energy,’ he confirmed.

In turn, this generates a number of associated benefits. These include optimisation of the solar panels – which are kept at their most effective operating temperature of 25°C irrespective of ambient conditions – and the delivery of all the generated electric power to support other more appropriate applications. These can vary from mobile phone recharging through ‘cloud’ connection to the internet to conventional electricity supply via an internal inverter that carries out DC-AC conversion.

Since March 2013 Attisani and his team have been devoted to the project and they have since developed two prototypes, one which was tested in Ghana with the support of a mixture of private funding, a crowdsourcing initiative and nearly EUR 1.5 million of funding from Horizon 2020.

The amount of power that a machine could generate rests on several important factors, though Attisani believes that 150kWhr per day could be achievable. The output of purified water from a fully functional machine operating at peak efficiency would potentially be around 5 000 litres per day. Finally, the machine’s IT capabilities promise to go beyond simply supporting personal communications, such as email – the company reckons that each machine could have a wireless connectivity zone with a radius of up to 1 kilometre.

Because of the purification process being one of distillation, the machine can also eradicate any type of contamination from the input water, bacterial, chemical and physical. In fact, Attisani claims that results from the purification process is so pure that the output water’s mineral content is effectively zero, something that Watly has addressed by providing the space for rocks to be packed into the machine so that water can be ‘remineralised’.

However, don’t expect to be able to able to install a 3.0 Watly machine anytime soon into your own home. Currently, given the volumes that Attisani is talking about, from end-to-end the machine is currently 40 metres in length and could cost up to around EUR 600 000 to 1 million, depending on the technologies built into it. Moving forward, Attisani recently announced that the company is currently working with the European Space Agency to create an application that would allow the machine to guide in a drone aircraft to deliver urgent supplies in crisis zones.

The full 3.0 Watly machine is due to be unveiled in May 2017 (also the official end of the self-named Horizon 2020 WATLY project) and the company currently has the capacity to manufacture 50 machines per year, with the first five units going to customers by the end of 2017.

Other issues R&D
China, Germany, Japan, Korea and the United States dominate global innovation - WIPO report 2019
New methodology developed to monitor patients with glioblastoma
Scientists find a place on Earth where there is no life
The embryonic origin of the Cyclops eye
Graphene activates immune cells helping bone regeneration in mice
Jurassic dinosaurs could have been dispersed between Africa and Europe 145 years ago
China´s Chang´e-4 probe lands on the moon
Artificial intelligence for studying the ancient human populations of Patagonia.
Chinese and European scientists propose 28 complementary colours
EU-wide rules for safety of drones approved by European Parliament

Subscribe free to our newsletter
Human Capital
Mobilizing commitment around change
Marta Santos Romero
Vanity Fea
Let´s get serious with Coronavirus
José Ángel García Landa
We can all be leaders
VIDEOCOMMUTING A NEW ORGANIZATIONAL REALITY THAT POSITIVELY IMPACTS EMPLOYEES
Mar Souto Romero
Financial inclusion
Financial Education For All!
Carlos Trias
Brusselian Lights
European elections (I): which words are more used in the European political manifestos?
Raúl Muriel Carrasco
Humor and Political Communication
Comisión de Arbitraje, Quejas y Deontología (Spain) (3) You can´t be too careful
Felicísimo Valbuena
Want your own blog? Want to be read by universities?
Find out here
Books
"Tthe study of human behaviour was political from the beginning"
The EU "An Obituary"
Startup Cities "Why Only a Few Cities Dominate the Global Startup Scene"
Blockchain Revolution "How the Technology Behind Bitcoin and Cryptocurrency Is Changing the World "
Doughnut Economics "Seven Ways to Think Like a 21st-Century Economist "
The People vs Tech "How the Internet Is Killing Democracy"
Theses and dissertations
1 Mobilizing commitment around change
Legal Advise | Privacy Policy | Editorial Board | Who we are | Ideology | Contact | Advertising rates | RSS RSS