This website uses its own and third-party cookies. Some of these cookies are used to develop analytical statistics of visits to the webpage, others to manage advertising or even others are necessary for the correct management of the site. If you continue to browse or click in accept we consider you accept the conditions for their use. You can get more information, or learn how to change the settings in our cookies policy?
Versión Española Versión Mexicana Ibercampus English Version Version française Versione italiana

10/7/2020  
    Ibercampus  | Editorial Board | Who we are | Ideology | Contact | Advertising rates | Subscription | RSS RSS
Policies
Inclusion policies
R&D
Employment
Economics
Culture
Green strategies
Health
Society and consumer
Sports
Debates
Interviews
Education
Grants & internships
Training
Trends
Enterprises & CSR
 Enterprises & CSR
ACNUR
AEGON
AIR LIQUIDE
ALCATEL-LUCENT
ALLIANZ
ARCELORMITTAL
ASIFIN
ASSICURAZIONI GENERALI
AXA
BANCO SANTANDER
BASF
BAYER
BBVA
BNP PARIBAS
CARREFOUR
DAIMLER AG
DEUTSCHE BANK
DEUTSCHE BÖRSE
DEUTSCHE TELEKOM
E.ON
ENEL
ENI
FORTIS
FRANCE TÉLÉCOM
GROUPE DANONE
IBERDROLA
INDITEX
ING GROUP
INTESA SANPAOLO
L'ORÉAL
LVMH
MUNICH RE
NOKIA
PHILIPS
RENAULT
REPSOL YPF
RWE
SAINT GOBAIN
SANOFI-AVENTIS
SAP AG
SCHNEIDER ELECTRIC
SIEMENS AG
SOCIÉTÉ GÉNÉRALE
SUEZ
TELECOM ITALIA
TELEFÓNICA
TOTAL S.A.
UNICREDIT
UNILEVER
VINCI
VIVENDI
VOLKSWAGEN

R&D
North Carolina State University.

Study identifies ways to share key data between researchers, business practitioners


Academic researchers study many aspects of business, but business practitioners rarely make use of that research. A multi-university research team reports that researchers and practitioners share more interests than either group realizes and outlines ways that the two groups can collaborate more effectively to address shared challenges.
Ibercampus 4/8/2016 Send to a friend
Comparte esta noticia en TwitterFacebookTwitterdel.icio.usYahooRSS
The researchers found that there are two key issues that contribute to the gap between researchers and practitioners -- and those two issues are essentially two sides of the same coin. First, there is a perception that there is little overlap in the interests of researchers and practitioners, which acts as a disincentive for them to work together. Second, generally speaking, the two groups know very little about each other -- meaning that neither group has a clear understanding of what the other group thinks is important.

To address these issues in detail, a team of researchers from NC State, the University of North Carolina at Charlotte, Virginia Commonwealth University and the University of Iowa conducted surveys of 929 business practitioners and 828 active researchers in business disciplines. The researchers also conducted in-depth interviews with 16 academics in the business field and 22 practitioners, ranging from "C-suite" executives and managers to government officials and legal advisors. The surveys and interviews focused on the needs and goals of the study participants.

The interview and survey data were consistent with each other, and identified clear areas of overlap.

"There are many more areas of common interest than either researchers or practitioners were aware of," says George Banks, lead author of the paper and an assistant professor of management at UNC-Charlotte. Specifically, both groups expressed significant interest in eight particular business challenges:
  • Reducing or eliminating pay inequality;
  • Reducing or eliminating workplace discrimination;
  • Reducing or eliminating unethical business practices;
  • Expanding opportunities for continuing education;
  • Leveraging technological innovation to improve job availability and quality;
  • Improving employee morale;
  • Reducing the carbon footprint of businesses and products;
  • And enhancing the quality of customer service.
"To be clear, we didn't give people a list of topics to choose from," says Brad Kirkman, co-author of the paper, General (Ret.) H. Hugh Shelton Distinguished Professor of Leadership and head of the Department of Management, Innovation and Entrepreneurship in NC State's Poole College of Management.

"These shared interests are subjects that researchers and practitioners brought up independently again and again when asked what they felt were the biggest challenges facing their fields."

"Interestingly, many of these challenges aren't focused on gaining a competitive advantage, but rather on addressing fundamental business practices that apply to multiple stakeholders in the domain of management," Pollack says.
The researchers also outlined four steps that could be taken by business schools to improve collaboration on these shared areas of interest.

First, the researchers urge the academic community to promote research findings. For example, faculty can work with university media offices to disseminate findings to reporters and the public.

Second, the researchers call for the creation of a new journal that is specifically focused on providing management professionals with practical advice they can actually use.
"We argue that peer-reviewed research can be both academically rigorous and relevant to practitioners - and we need a new journal that appreciates this," Pollack says.
Third, the researchers call on members of the business research community to use social media and other online platforms to reach out directly to business professionals.
Finally, the researchers suggest that business schools change the way they evaluate their faculty.

"Currently, evaluations of professors look at research, teaching and service," Kirkman says. "We propose that faculty also be evaluated based on 'practical impact.' That term may be defined differently in different places, but we think of it broadly as encompassing actions that researchers have made to reach business audiences -- whether that is by publishing books for a popular audience or working with businesses to help them craft business plans."

The researchers have already identified more than 160 businesses that are interested in working with the research community. "And that number is growing all the time," Pollack says. More information about these potential business/research partners is available from the authors.
"We are in the early stages of using these findings to implement change," Pollack says. "But we have every reason to believe that this change is inevitable, and that it will benefit both researchers and the business community."

Other issues R&D
China, Germany, Japan, Korea and the United States dominate global innovation - WIPO report 2019
New methodology developed to monitor patients with glioblastoma
Scientists find a place on Earth where there is no life
The embryonic origin of the Cyclops eye
Graphene activates immune cells helping bone regeneration in mice
Jurassic dinosaurs could have been dispersed between Africa and Europe 145 years ago
China´s Chang´e-4 probe lands on the moon
Artificial intelligence for studying the ancient human populations of Patagonia.
Chinese and European scientists propose 28 complementary colours
EU-wide rules for safety of drones approved by European Parliament

Subscribe free to our newsletter
Human Capital
Mobilizing commitment around change
Marta Santos Romero
Vanity Fea
Let´s get serious with Coronavirus
José Ángel García Landa
We can all be leaders
VIDEOCOMMUTING A NEW ORGANIZATIONAL REALITY THAT POSITIVELY IMPACTS EMPLOYEES
Mar Souto Romero
Financial inclusion
Financial Education For All!
Carlos Trias
Brusselian Lights
European elections (I): which words are more used in the European political manifestos?
Raúl Muriel Carrasco
Humor and Political Communication
Comisión de Arbitraje, Quejas y Deontología (Spain) (3) You can´t be too careful
Felicísimo Valbuena
Want your own blog? Want to be read by universities?
Find out here
Books
"Tthe study of human behaviour was political from the beginning"
The EU "An Obituary"
Startup Cities "Why Only a Few Cities Dominate the Global Startup Scene"
Blockchain Revolution "How the Technology Behind Bitcoin and Cryptocurrency Is Changing the World "
Doughnut Economics "Seven Ways to Think Like a 21st-Century Economist "
The People vs Tech "How the Internet Is Killing Democracy"
Theses and dissertations
1 Mobilizing commitment around change
Legal Advise | Privacy Policy | Editorial Board | Who we are | Ideology | Contact | Advertising rates | RSS RSS