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14/12/2019  
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R&D
Artculos 226 a 250 de 464
Parents of nanoscopy receive the Nobel Prize in ChemistryOptical observation at the molecular level

Parents of nanoscopy receive the Nobel Prize in Chemistry

The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences has decided to award the Nobel Prize in Chemistry for 2014 to Eric Betzig. Janelia Research Campus, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Ashburn; Stefan W. Hell Max Planck Institute for Biophysical Chemistr; and William E. Moerner Stanford University, Stanford, "for the development of super-resolved fluorescence microscopy" Leer ms

European Research

Nobel prizes Medicine goes to the Brains GPS

European Commission President Jos Manuel Barroso said: "I warmly congratulate John OKeefe, May‐Britt Moser and Edvard Moser on their achievement. I am particularly proud that both May-Britt and Edvard Moser are holders of European Research Council Advanced Grants. Leer ms

Height differences could be caused by DNA changes About 400 genome regions have been identified

Height differences could be caused by DNA changes

Subtle changes in our genetic make-up could help to explain why some people are taller than others, the largest ever study of height has suggested. About 400 genome regions have been identified that may be responsible for the extra inches, according to research involving more than 250,000 people. Scientists say this could pave the way for a simple test to reassure parents with fears about their childs growth. It may also shed more light on cancer, where cell growth is out of control. Leer ms

Quantum Speedup for Active Learning AgentsQuantum Speedup for Active Learning Agents

Can quantum mechanics help us build intelligent learning agents? A defining signature of intelligent behavior is the capacity to learn from experience. However, a major bottleneck for agents to learn in real-life situations is the size and complexity of the corresponding task environment. Even in a moderately realistic environment, it may simply take too long to rationally respond to a given situation.  Leer ms

RESAVER initiative

New pan-European pension fund to boost researcher mobility

Mobility of researchers in Europe received a boost today with the launch of a consortium that aims to establish a new pan-European pension arrangement. Once put in place, the RESAVER initiative would mean that researchers could move freely without having to worry about preserving their supplementary pension benefits Leer ms

Europes top young scientists honoured in Warsaw European Union Contest for Young Scientists

Europes top young scientists honoured in Warsaw

Four young scientists, hailing from Portugal and Czech Republic, were honoured with the top three prizes at the 26th annual European Union Contest for Young Scientists (EUCYS) in Warsaw last week Leer ms

Modern avians developed from the reptiles

Scientists decode how dinosaurs turned into birds

Researchers closely examined over 850 body features in 150 species of extinct birds and dinosaurs. This data allowed them to construct a detailed family tree, leading from bird-like dinosaurs to the earliest avian species. They found these changes started to develop around 150 million years ago, and the two groups of animals were similar to each other. Leer ms

Modern avians developed from the reptiles

Scientists decode how dinosaurs turned into birds

Researchers closely examined over 850 body features in 150 species of extinct birds and dinosaurs. This data allowed them to construct a detailed family tree, leading from bird-like dinosaurs to the earliest avian species. They found these changes started to develop around 150 million years ago, and the two groups of animals were similar to each other. Leer ms

Europes top young scientists chosen in Warsaw77 projects from 36 countries

Europes top young scientists chosen in Warsaw

110 researchers aged 14 to 20 have participated in the 26th annual European Union Contest for Young Scientists (EUCYS), which concluded with an awards ceremony. The winners divided up a total of 62.500 in prize money, as well as other coveted prizes such as science trips. Leer ms

The gravitomagnetic field could have an influence

An anomaly in satellites flybys confounds scientists

When space probes, such as Rosetta and Cassini, fly over certain planets and moons, in order to gain momentum and travel long distances, their speed changes slightly for an unknown reason. A Spanish researcher has now analysed whether or not a hypothetical gravitomagnetic field could have an influence. However, other factors such as solar radiation, tides, or even relativistic effects or dark matter could be behind this mystery. Leer ms

University of California findings

Human faces are so variable because we evolved to look unique

The amazing variety of human faces far greater than that of most other animals is the result of evolutionary pressure to make each of us unique and easily recognizable, according to a new study by University of California, Berkeley, scientists. Leer ms

With 1 billion euro investment

"Graphene" and "The Human Brain": the two ambitious European research projects

The European Commission published a report on its ambitious European science and technology Flagships. The report draws the lessons from setting up the first two such Flagships, Graphene and the Human Brain Project, each representing an investment of EUR 1 billion. It also sets out the future working arrangements for the two Flagships underway. Leer ms

Work in progress

Climate change, foreign policy and 2015 budget to be discussed at the European Parliament

Back to work after the summer recess, the European Parliament has plenty in its in-tray: climate change, foreign policy, illegal immigration, refugees, the EUs 2015 budget, scrutinising the new European Commission to be led by Jean-Claude Juncker Leer ms

Scientists map the Milky Ways local superclusters

Analysis of galaxies shows local supercluster to be 100 times larger than previously thought

The supercluster of galaxies that includes the Milky Way is 100 times bigger in volume and mass than previously thought, a team of astronomers says. Leer ms

EU 2015 Budget negotiations

European University Association warns against research funding cuts

The European University Association, has warned the Council of the European Union against making "considerable cuts" to proposed funding for research and innovation, including to the major framework programme Horizon 2020. Leer ms

EU 2015 Budget negotiations

The European University Association warns against research payments cuts

In July, the Council of the EUs Permanent Representatives Committee agreed its position on the EU draft budget for 2015, which is set to be negotiated in the next months with the other EU institutions(European Commission and Parliament). Leer ms

NASAs spacecraft crosses Neptunes orbitOn its way to Pluto

NASAs spacecraft crosses Neptunes orbit

NASAs spacecraft New Horizons has crossed the Neptunes orbit and now it is on its way to become the first probe to make the historic Pluto flyby on July 14, 2015. Passing through Neptunes orbit is the last major crossing before the spacecraft, New Horizons, reaches its intended destination of Pluto. Leer ms

Robo Brain will teach everything from the Internet

Scientists create a brain to teach robots to act as humans

Researchers have created "Robo Brain", a large-scale computational system that learns from publicly available Internet resources, to teach robots how humans naturally behave.The exclusive data bank for robots will help the machines learn how to find keys, pour a drink, put away dishes, and when not to interrupt two people having a conversation. Leer ms

Water Research

A study analyses water quality in glass and plastic bottles

Bottled water sold in Spain is practically free of constituents given off by plastic packaging or glass bottle lids. They are only detected in some cases, albeit in quantities much lower than limits found harmful for health. This was revealed by the analysis of more than 130 types of mineral water by researchers at the Institute of Environmental Assessment and Water Research of the Spanish National Research Council (CSIC). Leer ms

European satellite navigation

Galileo launches two more satellites into space

The EUs satellite navigation programme, will send two more satellites into space, reaching a total number of 6 satellites in orbit. The lift-off will take place at the European spaceport near Kourou in French Guiana, at 14.31 CET and can be viewed via live streaming Leer ms

Researchers from Austria, Germany, Italy and Switzerland

European scientists explore the brain capacity in physically disabled people

People with serious physical disabilities are unable to do the everyday things that most of us take for granted despite having the will and the brainpower to do so. This is changing thanks to European projects such as TOBI (Tools for Brain-Computer Interaction). People with limited mobility can write emails and even regain control of paralysed limbs through thought alone. Leer ms

EU-funded tool to help our brain deal with big data6.5 million of EU funding

EU-funded tool to help our brain deal with big data

EU researchers are developing an interactive system which not only presents data the way you like it, but also changes the presentation constantly in order to prevent brain overload. The project could enable students to study more efficiently or journalists to cross check sources more quickly. Several museums in Germany, the Netherlands, the UK and the United States have already showed interest in the new technology. Leer ms

Scientists discover the biggest penguin in the worldTaller than a man

Scientists discover the biggest penguin in the world

Scientists have discovered what they believe to be the biggest penguin to have ever waddled the Earth, standing taller than a human and weighing more than 115kg. The fossilized remains of this ancient mega penguin were uncovered on Seymour Island, just off the Antarctic at its nearest point to South America.  Leer ms

Therapy based on a peptide

Researchers study a new therapy for breast cancer using wasp venom

Scientists from the Institute for Biomedical Research (IRB Barcelona) have carried out successful in vitro tests using wasp venom to kill tumour cells. The next step will be to test its efficacy in mouse models. Leer ms

A mathematical theory explain the formation of fingersProposed by Alan Turing in 1952

A mathematical theory explain the formation of fingers

Researchers at the Multicellular Systems Biology Lab at the Centre for Genomic Regulation in Spain led by geneticist James Sharpe have used computational models to see whether Turings pattern mechanism can also be applied to how fingers form in the human embryo. In their experiments, they found that for fingers to form, three molecules need to be aligned--and the way in which they interact is pretty similar to Turings model. Leer ms
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Vanity Fea
The Virtual World We Inhabit
Jos ngel Garca Landa
We can all be leaders
VIDEOCOMMUTING A NEW ORGANIZATIONAL REALITY THAT POSITIVELY IMPACTS EMPLOYEES
Mar Souto Romero
Financial inclusion
Financial Education For All!
Carlos Trias
Brusselian Lights
European elections (I): which words are more used in the European political manifestos?
Ral Muriel Carrasco
Humor and Political Communication
Comisin de Arbitraje, Quejas y Deontologa (Spain) (3) You cant be too careful
Felicsimo Valbuena
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Books
"Tthe study of human behaviour was political from the beginning"
The EU "An Obituary"
Startup Cities "Why Only a Few Cities Dominate the Global Startup Scene"
Blockchain Revolution "How the Technology Behind Bitcoin and Cryptocurrency Is Changing the World "
Doughnut Economics "Seven Ways to Think Like a 21st-Century Economist "
The People vs Tech "How the Internet Is Killing Democracy"
Theses and dissertations
1 The Virtual World We Inhabit
2 Education 4.0: Beware the dark side of university restructuring
3 Squid pigments could be used in food and health for their antioxidant and antimicrobial properties
4 China, Germany, Japan, Korea and the United States dominate global innovation - WIPO report 2019
5 Graphene activates immune cells helping bone regeneration in mice
6 The embryonic origin of the Cyclops eye
7 Scientists find a place on Earth where there is no life
8 New methodology developed to monitor patients with glioblastoma
9 European climate emergency: EU should commit to net-zero greenhouse gas emissions by 2050
10 Health in the EU: shift to prevention and primary care is the most important trend across countries
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