This website uses its own and third-party cookies. Some of these cookies are used to develop analytical statistics of visits to the webpage, others to manage advertising or even others are necessary for the correct management of the site. If you continue to browse or click in accept we consider you accept the conditions for their use. You can get more information, or learn how to change the settings in our cookies policy?
Versión Española Versión Mexicana Ibercampus English Version Version française Versione italiana

19/2/2019  
    Ibercampus  | Editorial Board | Who we are | Ideology | Contact | Advertising rates | Subscription | RSS RSS
Policies
Inclusion policies
R&D
Employment
Economics
Culture
Green strategies
Health
Society and consumer
Sports
Debates
Interviews
Education
Grants & internships
Training
Trends
Enterprises & CSR
 Enterprises & CSR
ACNUR
AEGON
AIR LIQUIDE
ALCATEL-LUCENT
ALLIANZ
ARCELORMITTAL
ASIFIN
ASSICURAZIONI GENERALI
AXA
BANCO SANTANDER
BASF
BAYER
BBVA
BNP PARIBAS
CARREFOUR
DAIMLER AG
DEUTSCHE BANK
DEUTSCHE BÖRSE
DEUTSCHE TELEKOM
E.ON
ENEL
ENI
FORTIS
FRANCE TÉLÉCOM
GROUPE DANONE
IBERDROLA
INDITEX
ING GROUP
INTESA SANPAOLO
L'ORÉAL
LVMH
MUNICH RE
NOKIA
PHILIPS
RENAULT
REPSOL YPF
RWE
SAINT GOBAIN
SANOFI-AVENTIS
SAP AG
SCHNEIDER ELECTRIC
SIEMENS AG
SOCIÉTÉ GÉNÉRALE
SUEZ
TELECOM ITALIA
TELEFÓNICA
TOTAL S.A.
UNICREDIT
UNILEVER
VINCI
VIVENDI
VOLKSWAGEN

SOCIETY AND CONSUMER
She researches at the Instituto de Nanociencia de Aragón

Sassy Science, the world´s first drag queen to popularise science


Mario Peláez, from Asturias (Spain), is unique in his way of sharing knowledge. This doctoral student dresses in queen clothes to talk about research and call out the discrimination against women, people of colour (POC) and the LGTB+ community in laboratories. She had her social debut at the biennial Euroscience Open Forum (ESOF) congress, with the support of the European ´Enabling Excellence´ scholarship.
Ibercampus 1/2/2019 Send to a friend
Comparte esta noticia en TwitterFacebookTwitterdel.icio.usYahooRSS

She keeps her balance walking on her four inch heels. Her makeup is flawless and she wears coloured contact lenses that give her a feline look. Her mane contrasts with a dark beard. Reminiscences of the Eurovision singer Conchita Wurst are inevitable. She’s been told more than once. She dresses in rigorous black and does not leave an inch of skin uncovered: long-sleeved T-shirt, printed miniskirt, stockings and gloves that do not prevent her from displaying her fluorescent manicure.

“I'm very hairy,” she said, vainly, while fanning herself during a very hot evening in July 2018, in the City of Space in Toulouse (France).

The atomic structure of graphene, the material of the future due to its promising properties, enveloped her hair and neck. She did not go unnoticed among the scientists and journalists who were eating and drinking champagne at the reception of the biennial Euroscience Open Forum (ESOF) congress.

She is Sassy Science, the world´s first drag queen science populariser. “I've never seen anything like her. Maybe there are others... but I'm afraid not,” says Javier Armentia, the creator of the CienciaLGTBIQ website, who declares himself a “superfan” of the character.

Sassy Science is the alter ego of Mario Peláez (Langreo, Spain, 1992), a doctoral student at the Aragon Institute of Nanoscience who is in love with graphene. His drag queen outreach project emerged from the communication workshop he received at Enabling Excellence, an international training network of 13 PhD students in nanosciences and nanotechnology, funded by the European Union.

Millennial popularisation

Like any good millennial, Mario Peláez relies on social media to disseminate science and denounce the discrimination among researchers against young women, POC and the LGTB+ community in the STEM disciplines, which include science, technology, engineering and math. “I think drag is a good tool to empower these groups,” he states. He then reveals his plan B to change the situation: glitter!

So far, he has profiles in Instagram and Twitter, and YouTube channel, where he has already started to upload some videos about “queens”, as he refers to current and historical researchers, who are and were invisibilised. “Mario uses the media his community uses to reach his desired audience,” Ewels points out.

On Instagram and YouTube, he has already started to post videos about “queens”, as he refers to current and historical researchers

On his YouTube channel you can already find videos about the chemist Rosalind Frankin and the physicist Lise Metiner. He says he also wants to record more about Ada Lovelace and Marie Curie, although he jokingly admits that the Polish scientist “would need a whole special”. Aware of his privileges, he claims: “I want to look for a woman of colour (WOC) because this is starting to look a lot like white feminism.”

So far, the reactions to his persona have been positive. Mario says he feels “very welcomed” by the European project that saw the persona’s birth and the laboratory where he works. For his part, Ewels acknowledges the young man's effort: “Mario is passionate about what he does and Sassy Science has taken him out of his comfort zone. There is a great deal of merit in attending a congress [ESOF] with thousands of participants while doing drag.”

The resurgence of drag

There is not a single definition of what constitutes a drag queen. Many agree that the concept refers to a man who dresses as a woman and acts in accordance with the stereotypes socially attributed to one. Their expression is exaggerated and they usually confine their appearances to bars and shows.

But there are others who have a broader view. “We are all born naked and the rest is drag,” sings the American drag queen RuPaul in one of her songs. The artist has just released the fourth and final season of the reality show RuPaul's Drag All Stars Race on the Netflix platform, in which different drag queens compete for a prize of 100,000 US dollars and a place in the hall of fame.

For Mario Peláez, drag is an art with which he came into contact a couple of years ago through the Somos LGTB+association in the region of Aragón, where he was already doing activism and there is a lot of drag culture. “The creation of the drag identity rarely takes place on an individual basis. Drag families are a great community to turn to for creative and emotional support,” states Steven J. Hopkins of Virginia Polytechnic Institute and Radford University.

Now, Peláez uses drag as a means to popularise science without complexes. “I do this from an enormous respect for the drag culture, which has always been a driving force for activism and the fight for LGTB+ rights” he remembers. “Drag has made me think a lot about gender issues and my privileges as a cis white man. There are small micro-sexisms that people don't take into account,” he stresses.

Next July, Mario will present his doctoral thesis. “For me, science is the greatest thing. Although it requires a lot of sacrifice and I'm not going to see it through rose-tinted lenses, I can't imagine my life without doing science.” His research focuses on the electron microscopy of two-dimensional nanomaterials, such as graphene, which is what surrounds his neck whenever he is in drag.



Source: SINC

Other issues Society and consumer
European Parliament approves more transparency and efficiency in its internal rules
Recalling happy memories during adolescence can reduce risk of depression
Happy older people live longer, say researchers
Bad behavior to significant other in tough times has more impact than positive gestures
300 participants join the European Validation Festival
European Youth Forum urges Member States to reach an agreement on working conditions
Europe discusses AI ethical and social impact with philosophical and non-confessional organisations
Commission proposes €1.26 billion to reinforce the European Solidarity Corps
A new study provides "strong evidence" that more time spent in education is a risk factor for myopia
Ecuadorian politician and poet becomes fourth woman to preside over UN General Assembly

Subscribe free to our newsletter
Vanity Fea
The Joys of Teaching Literature
José Ángel García Landa
We can all be leaders
HUMAN CAPITAL IS ACHIEVING A NEW STATUS
Mar Souto Romero
Financial inclusion
Financial Education For All!
Carlos Trias
Brusselian Lights
European elections (I): which words are more used in the European political manifestos?
Raúl Muriel Carrasco
Humor and Political Communication
Comisión de Arbitraje, Quejas y Deontología (Spain) (3) You can´t be too careful
Felicísimo Valbuena
Want your own blog? Want to be read by universities?
Find out here
Books
The EU "An Obituary"
Startup Cities "Why Only a Few Cities Dominate the Global Startup Scene"
Blockchain Revolution "How the Technology Behind Bitcoin and Cryptocurrency Is Changing the World "
Doughnut Economics "Seven Ways to Think Like a 21st-Century Economist "
The People vs Tech "How the Internet Is Killing Democracy"
Will Big Business Destroy Our Planet?
Theses and dissertations
1 The Joys of Teaching Literature
2 Sassy Science, the world´s first drag queen to popularise science
3 Euro area unemployment at 7.9%
4 Commission presents a reflection paper on a more sustainable Europe by 2030
5 European Parliament approves more transparency and efficiency in its internal rules
Legal Advise | Privacy Policy | Editorial Board | Who we are | Ideology | Contact | Advertising rates | RSS RSS