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25/9/2020  
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EDUCATION
Research by banking group ING

Financial education needs to become compulsory in schools

Financial education has become an important complement to market conduct and prudential regulation and improving individual financial behaviours a long-term policy priority in many countries

National surveys show that young adults have amongst the lowest levels of financial literacy. This is reflected by their general inability to choose the right financial products and often a lack of interest in undertaking sound financial planning. Even from an early age, children need to develop the skills to help choose between different career and education options and manage any discretionary funds they may have, whether from allowances or part time jobs.
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Financial literacy is a core life skill for participating in modern society. Children are growing up in an increasingly complex world where they will eventually need to take charge of their own financial future.

Research by the organisation Ipsos for banking group ING found that 88% of adults in the UK said financial education should be taught in schools; the highest level of support of 12 European countries surveyed. Demand for financial education in schools was lowest in France, at 63%


Financial education will become compulsory in schools across England for the first time next year, following its inclusion in the new curriculum. Personal finance is already taught in some english schools in Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland.

Despite being the strongest supporter of financial education in school, only 12% of UK adults surveyed said they had been taught about money in class, lower than the weighted average of 13%

In contrast, a quarter of Austrians surveyed said they had received financial education lessons in school. However, the under-25s in Europe are much more likely to have received financial education at school than older age groups.

Almost 12,000 people in 12 countries were polled by Ipsos between April 18 and May 15 this year.

In 2012, financial literacy is an optional component of the OECD Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) PISA currently tests the attainment of 15-year-olds in mathematics, reading and science across 65 countries.

Financial education is a longterm process. Building it into curriculums from an early age allows children to acquire the knowledge and skills to build responsible financial behaviour throughout each stage of their education. This is especially important as parents may be ill-equipped to teach their children about money: levels of financial literacy are generally low around the world.

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