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21/5/2019  
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HEALTH
Potential gender differences

Females are better doctors than males


Females are more likely to provide better care because they have a higher chance of sending patients to important check-ups and giving them the correct prescriptions, suggest researchers. However, this may become costly, since women are thought to be less productive in the hospital environment.
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According to a University of Montreal research team, the quality of care provided by female doctors is higher than that of their male counterparts while the productivity of males is greater.

The study focused on the doctors´ procedures on elderly diabetic patients to see if they were in line with
the recommendations of the Canadian Diabetes Association, which provides clear guidelines for clinical treatment of the disease.

The research team reached this conclusion by studying the billing information of over 870 Quebec practitioners (half of whom were women) relating to their procedures with elderly diabetic patients. "Women had significantly higher scores in terms of compliance with practice guidelines. They were more likely than men to prescribe recommended medications and to plan required examinations,” said lead study author Valérie Martel.

Three out of five young doctors in hospitals and in operating procedures are women

Researcher Valerie Martel from the University of Montreal went through billing information from over 850 doctors in Quebec—half of those practitioners were women, dealing with old diabetic patients.

“Women had significantly higher scores in terms of compliance with practice guidelines. They were more likely than men to prescribe recommended medications and to plan required examinations,” Martel said.
To illustrate for middle-aged practitioners— three out of every four female doctors sent their patients to get an eye exam while only seven out of ten male doctors did the same. Additionally, 71 percent of women accurately prescribed the needed medication for their patients, while 67 percent of men did so too.

Productivity of male doctors is greater

Another example is when 39 percent of female doctors asked their patients to get a complete check-up while just six percent of male doctors asked their patients to do this. However, if productivity were put under the spotlight, men dominated this category. Male doctors were noted as performing one thousand more procedures per year. “It seemed to me that more and more men are taking time with their patients at the expense of productivity, and more and more women tend to increase their number of procedures. This aspect was shown. The younger the doctors, the less significant the differences,” Martel commented.

“Doctors who take the time to explain problems to their patients may avoid these patients returning after a month because they are worried about a detail. The more productive physicians may not be the ones we think,” Professor Regis Blais, who supervised the study, said.


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