This website uses its own and third-party cookies. Some of these cookies are used to develop analytical statistics of visits to the webpage, others to manage advertising or even others are necessary for the correct management of the site. If you continue to browse or click in accept we consider you accept the conditions for their use. You can get more information, or learn how to change the settings in our cookies policy?
Versión Española Versión Mexicana Ibercampus English Version Version française Versione italiana

8/12/2019  
    Ibercampus  | Editorial Board | Who we are | Ideology | Contact | Advertising rates | Subscription | RSS RSS
Policies
Inclusion policies
R&D
Employment
Economics
Culture
Green strategies
Health
Society and consumer
Sports
Debates
Interviews
Education
Grants & internships
Training
Trends
Enterprises & CSR
 Enterprises & CSR
ACNUR
AEGON
AIR LIQUIDE
ALCATEL-LUCENT
ALLIANZ
ARCELORMITTAL
ASIFIN
ASSICURAZIONI GENERALI
AXA
BANCO SANTANDER
BASF
BAYER
BBVA
BNP PARIBAS
CARREFOUR
DAIMLER AG
DEUTSCHE BANK
DEUTSCHE BRSE
DEUTSCHE TELEKOM
E.ON
ENEL
ENI
FORTIS
FRANCE TLCOM
GROUPE DANONE
IBERDROLA
INDITEX
ING GROUP
INTESA SANPAOLO
L'ORAL
LVMH
MUNICH RE
NOKIA
PHILIPS
RENAULT
REPSOL YPF
RWE
SAINT GOBAIN
SANOFI-AVENTIS
SAP AG
SCHNEIDER ELECTRIC
SIEMENS AG
SOCIT GNRALE
SUEZ
TELECOM ITALIA
TELEFNICA
TOTAL S.A.
UNICREDIT
UNILEVER
VINCI
VIVENDI
VOLKSWAGEN

SOCIETY AND CONSUMER
Predicting Vertical Urban Growth

A genetic algorithm predicts the vertical growth of cities


The increase of skyscrapers in a city resembles the development of some living systems. Spanish researchers have created an evolutionary genetic algorithm that, on the basis of the historical and economic data of an urban area, can predict what its skyline could look like in the coming years. The method has been applied successfully to the thriving Minato Ward, in Tokyo.
Ibercampus 31/5/2018 Send to a friend
Comparte esta noticia en TwitterFacebookTwitterdel.icio.usYahooRSS

Scientists have realized that the growth of cities follows patterns similar to those of certain self-organized biological systems. Inspired by nature, they have developed genetic algorithms that predict how the number of skyscrapers and other buildings in an urban area will increase.

"We operate within evolutionary computation, a branch of artificial intelligence and machine learning that uses the basic rules of genetics and Darwin's natural selection logic to make predictions," explains architect Ivan Pazos.

Evolutionary computation uses the basic rules of genetics and Darwin's natural selection logic to make predictions, in this case, urban predictions

"In this type of computing, a multitude of possible solutions to a problem are randomly combined," adds the expert, who currently works for a Japanese architectural firm, “and a selection system is choosing the best results. This operation is repeated again and again until the algorithms get the most accurate results."

In this way, Pazos and a team of researchers from the University of A Coruña (Spain) have created algorithms –based on other standard genetic algorithms– that learn the growth patterns of urban districts using historical data from the construction sector and different economic parameters.

The study, published in the Journal of Urban Planning and Development, has focused on one of the neighbourhoods with the highest vertical growth in the world in recent years: the Minato Ward, in Tokyo, where the headquarters of multinational companies such as Mitsubishi, Honda, NEC, Toshiba or Sony, are located. "This methodology could have been applied to any other city with a high number of skyscrapers," Pazos points out.

The predictions of the algorithm have been very accurate with respect to the evolution of the Minato skyline

In 2015, once all the information had been gathered, the authors created a series of maps and 3D representations of Minato to be able to predict the number of buildings and their probable locations within this booming ward in the following years during the 2016-2019 period.

"The predictions of the algorithm have been very accurate with respect to the actual evolution of the Minato skyline in 2016 and 2017," says Pazos, who comments: "Now we are evaluating their accuracy for 2018 and 2019 and it seems, according to the observations, that they will be 80% correct."

According to the authors, the algorithm not only estimates the number of future skyscrapers in a neighbourhood of the city, but also the specific areas where they will be most likely be located.

"The final conclusion of the study is that evolutionary computation seems to be able to find growth patterns that are not obvious in complex urban systems, and by means of its subsequent application, it serves the function of predicting possible scenarios for the evolution of cities." concludes Pazos.

References:

Rafael Ivan Pazos Perez, Adrian Carballal, Juan R. Rabuñal, Omar A. Mures and María D. García-Vidaurrázaga. “Predicting Vertical Urban Growth Using Genetic Evolutionary Algorithms in Tokyo's Minato Ward”. Journal of Urban Planning and Development 144: 1, March 2018.


Other issues Society and consumer
Sassy Science, the worlds first drag queen to popularise science
European Parliament approves more transparency and efficiency in its internal rules
Recalling happy memories during adolescence can reduce risk of depression
Happy older people live longer, say researchers
Bad behavior to significant other in tough times has more impact than positive gestures
300 participants join the European Validation Festival
European Youth Forum urges Member States to reach an agreement on working conditions
Europe discusses AI ethical and social impact with philosophical and non-confessional organisations
Commission proposes 1.26 billion to reinforce the European Solidarity Corps
A new study provides "strong evidence" that more time spent in education is a risk factor for myopia

Subscribe free to our newsletter
Vanity Fea
The Virtual World We Inhabit
Jos ngel Garca Landa
We can all be leaders
VIDEOCOMMUTING A NEW ORGANIZATIONAL REALITY THAT POSITIVELY IMPACTS EMPLOYEES
Mar Souto Romero
Financial inclusion
Financial Education For All!
Carlos Trias
Brusselian Lights
European elections (I): which words are more used in the European political manifestos?
Ral Muriel Carrasco
Humor and Political Communication
Comisin de Arbitraje, Quejas y Deontologa (Spain) (3) You cant be too careful
Felicsimo Valbuena
Want your own blog? Want to be read by universities?
Find out here
Books
"Tthe study of human behaviour was political from the beginning"
The EU "An Obituary"
Startup Cities "Why Only a Few Cities Dominate the Global Startup Scene"
Blockchain Revolution "How the Technology Behind Bitcoin and Cryptocurrency Is Changing the World "
Doughnut Economics "Seven Ways to Think Like a 21st-Century Economist "
The People vs Tech "How the Internet Is Killing Democracy"
Theses and dissertations
1 Graphene activates immune cells helping bone regeneration in mice
2 The Virtual World We Inhabit
3 Scientists find a place on Earth where there is no life
4 New methodology developed to monitor patients with glioblastoma
5 Health in the EU: shift to prevention and primary care is the most important trend across countries
6 China, Germany, Japan, Korea and the United States dominate global innovation - WIPO report 2019
7 The embryonic origin of the Cyclops eye
8 European climate emergency: EU should commit to net-zero greenhouse gas emissions by 2050
9 "Tthe study of human behaviour was political from the beginning"
Legal Advise | Privacy Policy | Editorial Board | Who we are | Ideology | Contact | Advertising rates | RSS RSS